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Lunch and Learn Free Lectures

Save the date! You won't want to miss any of our dynamic speakers and the opportunity to learn about Maryland's past at our popular lunchtime series. All events start at 12 Noon. Check our upcoming events page as we get closer to each event listed below for more details about each free event. Remember to contact Emily Oland Squires by phone or email to RSVP for this free series at emily.squires@maryland.gov or 410-260-6443.

As a note, we ask you to bring your own bag lunch and a photo ID for entry into the Archives. We look forward to seeing you soon!


January

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January 23

Community History from the Archives: Arundel-on-the-Bay

Share in local community history uncovered in the archives. Join the authors of "The Amazing Story of Arundel-on-the-Bay: 1600s to Today" who came together five years ago to research and write a book detailing the history of their beloved home. The book chronicles a community evolving from the Gay Nineties, through the segregated Jim Crow era, World War II, woman’s liberation, and other 20th and 21st century realities. The talk will focus on sharing a portrait of America’s social and cultural history that shaped this local community. Copies of the book will be for sale with the authors available for signing.

February

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February 13

Crownsville Hospital Patient Cemetery

A look at the history of the Crownsville State Hospital, its establishment and the tradition of burials at Bacon Ridge. Janice Hayes-Williams, historian, columnist and Director of Community Engagement and Constituent Services for Anne Arundel County, will discuss the process of discovering the identity of more than 1,500 African American laid to rest on the original site of the Hospital for the Negro Insane.

Lecture by Janice Hayes-Williams, historian, columnist and Director of Community Engagement and Constituent Services for A.A. County

March

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March 20

Pirates and Privateers on the Chesapeake

Join us to learn who were motivated by religion and who by politics; who was a surgeon, an anthropologist and the founder of one of the most respectable colleges on the East Coast, and who guided and influenced geographers, naturalists, explorers, and even the Royal and American Navies for centuries.

Lecture by Dr. Susan Langley, Maryland State Underwater Archeologist


 

March

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March 27

Maryland Day Event

Come celebrate Maryland Day with Dr. Jean B. Russo, co-editor and a co-author of the newly published, Maryland: A History. Dr. Russo will share some highlights from this second edition, including and exploration of some of the approximately 200 color images which show the many ways to visually document the past, as well as discuss the wide range of sources available to provide evidence of over 400 years of the state's history. Please join us at the Archives for a commemoration of our great state's founding! Copies of Maryland: A History will also be available for purchase and author signing.


by Dr. Jean Russo, co-editor and co-author of Maryland: A History

April

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April 3

Lunch and Learn Goes to the Movies: Mr. Besley’s Forest

In honor of Arbor Day, we present a screening of a film documenting Maryland’s deep roots in conservation, forestry, history, and the National Big Tree program.

by Cheryle Franceschi, Vice Chair, Carroll County Forest Conservancy Board District

May

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May 1

Birthright Citizens

Birthright Citizens recovers the story of how African American activists remade national belonging through battles in legislatures, conventions, and courthouses. They faced formidable opposition, most notoriously from the US Supreme Court decision in Dred Scott. With fresh archival sources and an ambitious reframing of constitutional law-making before the Civil War, Jones shows how when the Fourteenth Amendment constitutionalized the birthright principle, the aspirations of black Americans' aspirations were realized.

by Dr. Martha Jones


 


June

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June 19

The Naylors of Woodborough, or How we turned a pile of research papers into a book

Part history, part genealogy, part narrative, The Naylors of Woodborough, is the work of five researchers who collaborated to publish this Maryland family’s 350-year history. This is a local story written in the broader context of American history themes. What began as a simple exercise in information gathering and sharing grew into a 304-page book, which now serves as the primary published resource for Naylor research in America. Franklin Robinson, Jr. and Debra Naylor (two of the five authors) will talk about their research, collaboration, and the process of turning a pile of papers into a book. The Naylors of Woodborough, by Joseph Y. Rowe, Debra Naylor, Ruth Naylor, Brenda Ramsey and Franklin A. Robinson, Jr. was awarded the Sumner A. Parker Prize and the St. George’s Day Award and will be available for purchase after the talk.


by Frank Robinson and Debra Naylor

July

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July 17

Colonial Law Enforcement and Murder Cases

by Allen Hafner Howard County Police Officer, Retired

August

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August 28

Baltimore Women and Benevolence During the Civil War

In honor of the 99th Anniversary of Women’s Suffrage this month

by Rob Schoeberlein


September

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September 11

Burial Ground at Serenity Farm

by Frank Robinson

October

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October 23

The History of Belvoir

By Dr. Julie M. Schablitsky, Chief Archaeologist, Maryland State Highway Administration Cultural Resources Section


October 30

Spooky Stories from the Archives

by Rachel Frazier

November

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November 6

Robert Eden

by Michelle Fitzgerald, Curator of Homewood


December

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December 4

Lunch and Learn Goes to the Movies: Screening of Documentary Film Voices of Baltimore: Life Under Segregation

The purpose of this film is to capture and preserve the rich oral histories of an aging and diminishing population of African Americans who 1) grew up in the Mason/Dixon border area of Baltimore, and 2) who lived through the era of legal segregation (i.e., Jim Crow south). The narratives document the relevant lives of individuals who attended segregated schools and/or desegregation before and following the 1954 Supreme Court Brown v Board of Education ruling.



by Filmmakers Dr. Gary Homana and Dr. Morna McDermott McNulty


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© Copyright February 25, 2019 Maryland State Archives